Climate

  • Photo of A drop in CFC emissions puts the hole in the ozone layer back on track to closing

    A drop in CFC emissions puts the hole in the ozone layer back on track to closing

    Good news for the ozone layer: After a recent spike in CFC-11 pollution, emissions of this ozone-destroying chemical are on the decline. Emissions of trichlorofluoromethane, or CFC-11, were supposed to taper off after the Montreal Protocol banned CFC-11 production in 2010 (SN: 7/7/90). But 2014 to 2017 saw an unexpected bump. About half of that illegal pollution was pegged to…

    Read More »
  • Photo of High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters

    High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters

    Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained. In a study published in Nature Communications, Umeå University researchers and collaborators quantify carbon emissions from rivers and lakes across Western Siberia, finding that emission are high and exceed carbon export to the Arctic Ocean.…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed

    Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed

    Passive cooling, like the shade a tree provides, has been around forever. Recently, researchers have been exploring how to turbo charge a passive cooling technique — known as radiative or sky cooling — with sun-blocking, nanomaterials that emit heat away from building rooftops. While progress has been made, this eco-friendly technology isn’t commonplace because researchers have struggled to maximize the…

    Read More »
  • Photo of New timeline of deadliest California wildfire could guide lifesaving research and action

    New timeline of deadliest California wildfire could guide lifesaving research and action

    On a brisk November morning in 2018, a fire sparked in a remote stretch of canyon in Butte County, California, a region nestled against the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Fueled by a sea of tinder created by drought, and propelled by powerful gusts, the flames grew and traveled rapidly. In less than 24 hours, the fire had…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation

    Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation

    One of humanity’s biggest challenges right now is reducing our emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Research groups worldwide are trying to find ways to efficiently separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from the mixture of gases emitted from industrial plants and power stations. Among the many strategies for accomplishing this, membrane separation is an attractive, inexpensive option; it involves using…

    Read More »
  • Photo of What is a heat dome?

    What is a heat dome?

    A heat dome occurs when the atmosphere traps hot ocean air like a lid or cap. High-pressure circulation in the atmosphere acts like a dome or cap, trapping heat at the surface and favoring the formation of a heat wave. Summertime means hot weather — sometimes dangerously hot — and extreme heat waves have become more frequent in recent decades.…

    Read More »
  • Photo of How do hurricanes form?

    How do hurricanes form?

    Hurricanes are powerhouse weather events that suck heat from tropical waters to fuel their fury. These violent storms form over the ocean, often beginning as a tropical wave—a low pressure area that moves through the moisture-rich tropics, possibly enhancing shower and thunderstorm activity. As this weather system moves westward across the tropics, warm ocean air rises into the storm, forming…

    Read More »
  • Photo of What is a gyre?

    What is a gyre?

    Wind, tides, and differences in temperature and salinity drive ocean currents. The ocean churns up different types of currents, such as eddies, whirlpools, or deep ocean currents. Larger, sustained currents—the Gulf Stream, for example—go by proper names. Taken together, these larger and more permanent currents make up the systems of currents known as gyres. There are five major gyres: the…

    Read More »
  • Photo of What is a meteotsunami?

    What is a meteotsunami?

    Seiches and meteotsunamis. What’s the difference? Seiches and meteotsunamis are often grouped together, but they are two different events. Winds and atmospheric pressure can contribute to the formation of both seiches and meteotsunamis; however, winds are typically more important to a seiche motion, while pressure often plays a substantial role in meteotsunami formation. Sometimes a seiche and a meteotsunami can…

    Read More »
Back to top button
Close
Close