Oceans

  • Photo of An inner sensor of body movement revealed in zebrafish

    An inner sensor of body movement revealed in zebrafish

    Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have revealed a central proprioceptive organ built directly into the central nervous system that acts as an inner movement sensor. The article was recently published in the journal Neuron. “To successfully move our bodies, we need a reliable sense of our own movement in time and space. This sense is provided by proprioceptor organs thought only…

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  • Photo of Study: Humpback whales aren’t learning their songs from one another

    Study: Humpback whales aren’t learning their songs from one another

    Humpback and bowhead whales are the only mammals other than humans thought to progressively change the songs they sing through a process of cultural learning. But maybe the humpbacks are no longer part of that trio. Humpbacks might be singing songs that are not as ‘cultured’ as once assumed. A new study by a University at Buffalo researcher is directly…

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  • Photo of Defeating the enemy within: How evolution helps clone fish with their genetic burden

    Defeating the enemy within: How evolution helps clone fish with their genetic burden

    According to scientific theories, clonal vertebrates actually have a harder time succeeding than species that reproduce sexually. One natural clone is the Amazon molly. A research team led by the Biozentrum of the University of Würzburg with the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) has shown that over hundreds of thousands of years, this small fish has…

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  • Photo of Cod behave differently in noisy environments

    Cod behave differently in noisy environments

    Underwater noise from seismic surveys affects the behavior of Atlantic cod. These are the results of research by Leiden biologists in collaboration with colleagues from Belgium. During such surveys the fish are less active than usual and their circadian rhythm is disrupted; soon after exposure they appear to leave the area more quickly. This could have an effect on the…

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  • Photo of Moray eels thrive on coral reefs close to people—overfishing of other predators, like sharks, may be the cause

    Moray eels thrive on coral reefs close to people—overfishing of other predators, like sharks, may be the cause

    Coral reefs that are in close proximity to larger populations of people tend to have fewer sharks and other fish due to higher fishing pressure. But new research shows there’s one group of predators that’s the exception—moray eels. Scientists from FIU’s Institute of Environment used a combination of video data from Global FinPrint—the world’s first and largest shark and ray…

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  • Photo of Sawfish face global extinction unless overfishing is curbed

    Sawfish face global extinction unless overfishing is curbed

    Sawfish have disappeared from half of the world’s coastal waters and the distinctive shark-like rays face complete extinction due to overfishing, according to a new study by Simon Fraser University researchers, published in Science Advances. Sawfish, named after their unique long, narrow noses lined by teeth, called rostra, that resemble a sawblade, were once found along the coastlines of 90…

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  • Photo of Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

    Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

    The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows. Coral goby groups contain a single breeding male and female and—as “sequential hermaphrodites”—the subordinate gobies can take over either role if one of the breeders dies. The puzzle for biologists is why breeders tolerate the smaller non-breeders sharing their space…

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  • Photo of Ancient seashell resonates after 18,000 years

    Ancient seashell resonates after 18,000 years

    Almost 80 years after its discovery, a large shell from the ornate Marsoulas Cave in the Pyrenees has been studied by a multidisciplinary team from the CNRS, the Muséum de Toulouse, the Université Toulouse — Jean Jaurès and the Musée du quai Branly — Jacques-Chirac (1): it is believed to be the oldest wind instrument of its type. Scientists reveal…

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  • Rapid ice retreat during last deglaciation parallels current melt rates

    Ten thousand square kilometres of ice disappeared in a blink of an eye from an ice sheet in the Storfjorden Trough offshore Svalbard, a new study shows. This dramatic break off was preceded by quite a rapid melt of 2.5 kilometres of ice a year. This parallels the current melt rates in Antarctica and Greenland and worries the scientists behind…

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  • Photo of A Dance of Sharks and Gulls: Underwater Photography Prize Winners

    A Dance of Sharks and Gulls: Underwater Photography Prize Winners

    Renee Capozzola’s photograph of blacktip reef sharks cruising menacingly beneath sea gulls at sunset in French Polynesia has been crowned winner of Underwater Photographer of the Year 2021. Capozzola’s photograph triumphed over 4,500 underwater pictures entered by underwater photographers from 68 countries around the world. She is the first female photographer to be named overall winner of the prestigious international…

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