Archaeology

  • Photo of Stonehenge may have had roots in a Welsh stone circle

    Stonehenge may have had roots in a Welsh stone circle

    At an ancient site situated among the hills of western Wales, researchers suspect they have uncovered the remnants of a stone circle that contained initial building blocks of Stonehenge. Excavations of the site are in the early stages, but the stone circle was probably dismantled between 5,400 and 5,200 years ago, say University College London archaeologist Mike Parker Pearson and…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Humans made a horn out of a conch shell about 18,000 years ago

    Humans made a horn out of a conch shell about 18,000 years ago

    Ancient Europeans made a horn out of a large seashell and blew musical notes out of it roughly 18,000 years ago, a new study suggests. While it’s not known how ancient people used the shell horn, conch shells in historical and modern cultures have served as musical instruments, calling or signaling devices and sacred or magical objects, researchers say. People…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Humans are more like primitive fishes, new research shows

    Humans are more like primitive fishes, new research shows

    People traditionally think that lungs and limbs are key innovations that came with the vertebrate transition from water to land. But in fact, the genetic basis of air-breathing and limb movement was already established in our fish ancestor 50 million years earlier. This, according to a recent genome mapping of primitive fish conducted by the University of Copenhagen, among others.…

    Read More »
  • Photo of An ancient Egyptian mummy was wrapped in an unusual mud shell

    An ancient Egyptian mummy was wrapped in an unusual mud shell

    An unusual mud-wrapped mummy is leading archaeologists to rethink how nonroyal Egyptians preserved their dead. CT scans of an Egyptian mummy from around 1200 B.C. reveal that the body is sheathed in a mud shell between its layers of linen wrappings. Ancient Egyptians may have used this preservation technique, never before seen in Egyptian archaeology, to repair damage to the…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Dinosaur frills were for attracting mates, not protection

    Dinosaur frills were for attracting mates, not protection

    A small sheep-sized dinosaur that lived more than 70 million years ago evolved to have a “huge” neck frill as a result of sexual selection, according to scientists. The Protoceratops, a 1.8m-long plant-eating dinosaur that roamed what is now Mongolia’s Gobi Desert, had elaborate bony frills that extended over the neck. It is thought that the frills may have served…

    Read More »
Back to top button
Close
Close