Medicine & Health

  • Never-before-seen antibody binding, informing liver cancer, antibody design

    In structural biology, some molecules are so unusual they can only be captured with a unique set of tools. That’s precisely how a multi-institutional research team led by Salk scientists defined how antibodies can recognize a compound called phosphohistidine — a highly unstable molecule that has been found to play a central role in some forms of cancer, such as…

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  • New possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death

    Nearly a half-million people a year die from sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the U.S. — the result of malfunctions in the heart’s electrical system. A leading cause of SCD in young athletes is arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a genetic disease in which healthy heart muscle is replaced over time by scar tissue (fibrosis) and fat. Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor…

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  • Photo of Panama disease breakthrough sparks US funding

    Panama disease breakthrough sparks US funding

    QUT researcher and Distinguished Professor James Dale and his team have successfully developed a line of Cavendish bananas resistant to Panama disease tropical race 4 (TR4). The development of the TR4 resistant line has led to a multi-million-dollar partnership with US-based international fresh fruit and vegetable leader, Fresh Del Monte. Professor Dale said the funding would enable his research team…

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  • Radioactive bone cement may be safer in treating spinal tumors

    A radioactive bone cement that’s injected into bone to provide support and local irradiation is proving to be a safer alternative to conventional radiation therapy for bone tumors, according to a study led by University of California, Irvine researchers. The study shows that this brachytherapy cement can be placed into spinal bones to directly irradiate tumors without harming the spinal…

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  • New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs

    MIT researchers have invented a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees to better control their residual muscles and sense where their “phantom limb” is in space. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as a reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. In most amputations, muscle pairs that control…

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  • New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor

    Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer’s levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the…

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  • Immunotherapy — targeted drug combination improves survival in advanced kidney cancer

    Patients with advanced kidney cancer, who received a targeted drug combined with a checkpoint-blocker immunotherapy agent had longer survival than patients treated with the standard targeted drug, said an investigator from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, reporting results from a phase 3 clinical trial. The survival benefit demonstrates that an immune checkpoint inhibitor together with a targeted kinase inhibitor drug “is important…

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  • Star-shaped brain cells may be linked to stuttering

    Astrocytes — star-shaped cells in the brain that are actively involved in brain function — may play an important role in stuttering, a study led by a University of California, Riverside, expert on stuttering has found. “Our study suggests that treatment with the medication risperidone leads to increased activity of the striatum in persons who stutter,” said Dr. Gerald A.…

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  • ‘Gamechanger’ drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20 percent

    One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth (greater than or equal to 20%) of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers. The findings from the large-scale international trial, published today in the New England Journal for Medicine, are being hailed as a “gamechanger” for…

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  • Sleep keeps teens on track for good mental health

    As families settle back into a new school year, sleep experts at the University of South Australia are reminding parents about the importance of teenagers getting enough sleep, cautioning them that insufficient sleep can negatively affect their mental health. In a new research paper, UniSA sleep experts Dr Alex Agostini and Dr Stephanie Centofanti confirm that sleep is intrinsically linked…

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