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  • Fungi in the intestines significantly increase immunity from infection

    Common fungi, often present in the gut, teach the immune system how to respond to their more dangerous relatives, according to new research. Breakdowns in this process can leave people susceptible to deadly fungal infections.

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  • New research sheds light on vision loss in Batten disease

    Progressive vision loss, and eventually blindness, are the hallmarks of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or CLN3-Batten disease. New research shows how the mutation associated with the disease could potentially lead to degeneration of light sensing photoreceptor cells in the retina, and subsequent vision loss.

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  • Breakthrough in quantum photonics promises a new era in optical circuits

    Researchers have shown that single photons can be emitted in a uniform way from quantum dots arranged in a precise pattern. The team has used such methods to create single-quantum dots, with their remarkable single-photon emission characteristics. It is expected that the ability to precisely align uniformly-emitting quantum dots will enable the production of optical circuits, potentially leading to novel…

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  • New way to power up nanomaterials for electronic applications

    Materials scientists have discovered that perovskites, a class of promising materials that could be used for low-cost, high-performance solar cells and LEDs, have a previously unutilized molecular component that can further tune the electronic property of perovskites.

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  • Remyelinating drug could improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Biomedical scientists reports a drug — an estrogen receptor ligand called indazole chloride (IndCl) — has the potential to improve vision in patients with multiple sclerosis, or MS. The study was performed on mice induced with a model of MS and the first to investigate IndCl’s effect on the pathology and function of the complete afferent visual pathway.

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  • COVID-19 lockdowns temporarily raised global temperatures, research shows

    The lockdowns and reduced societal activity related to the COVID-19 pandemic affected emissions of pollutants in ways that slightly warmed the planet for several months last year, according to new research. The counterintuitive finding highlights the influence of airborne particles, or aerosols, that block incoming sunlight.

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  • Sea level will rise faster than previously thought

    There are two main elements to observe when assessing sea level rise. One is the loss of the ice on land and the other is that the sea will expand as it gets warmer. Researchers have constructed a new method of quantifying just how fast the sea will react to global warming. Former predictions of sea level have been too…

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  • Arctic shrubs add new piece to ecological puzzle

    A 15-year experiment on Arctic shrubs in Greenland lends new understanding to an enduring ecological puzzle: How do species with similar needs and life histories occur together at large scales while excluding each other at small scales? Its findings also reveal trends related to carbon sequestration and climate change as the Arctic becomes both greener and browner.

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  • Study challenges ecology’s ‘Field of Dreams’ hypothesis

    A new study challenges the ‘Field of Dreams’ hypothesis in restoration ecology, which predicts that restoring plant biodiversity will lead to recovery of animal biodiversity. The study of restored tallgrass prairie found the effects of management strategies (specifically controlled burns and bison reintroduction) on animal communities were six times stronger on average than the effects of plant biodiversity.

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  • Modeling the brain during pain processing

    Researchers show that inhibitory interneurons, which prevent chemical messages from passing between different regions of the brain, make up 20% of the circuitry in the brain required for pain processing. The discovery represents a significant advance in researchers’ understanding of how our bodies and brains respond to pain.

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