Ecosystems

  • Photo of Spotted lanternfly: Research accelerates in effort to contain invasive pest

    Spotted lanternfly: Research accelerates in effort to contain invasive pest

    When the invasive spotted lanternfly arrived in the United States in 2014, it was immediately recognized for the threat it posed to native plants and crops. A community of researchers and experts in science, agriculture, and government sprang into action to respond, improving our chances for containing the pest and curbing its potential for damage. While the effort continues, a…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Turf wars: Ocean acidification and feedback loops lock in turf algal systems

    Turf wars: Ocean acidification and feedback loops lock in turf algal systems

    It’s tough out there in the sea, as the widespread loss of complex marine communities is testament to. Researchers from Japan have discovered that ocean acidification favors degraded turf algal systems over corals and other algae, thanks to the help of feedback loops. In a study published this month in Communications Biology, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have revealed…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Wood-eating cockroach couples take turns eating each other’s wings after mating

    Wood-eating cockroach couples take turns eating each other’s wings after mating

    A pair of researchers at Kyushu University in Japan, has found that at least one kind of wood-eating cockroach engages in mutual wing eating after mating. In their paper published in the journal Ethology, Haruka Osaki and Eiiti Kasuya describe how they happened to notice chewed-off wings in a species of cockroach and what they found when they brought some…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease

    Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease

    A new analysis of thousands of native and nonnative Michigan bees shows that the most diverse bee communities have the lowest levels of three common viral pathogens. University of Michigan researchers netted and trapped more than 4,000 bees from 60 species. The bees were collected at winter squash farms across Michigan, where both managed honeybee colonies and wild native bees…

    Read More »
  • How messenger substances influence individual decision-making

    A research team of psychologists and physicists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg investigated the neurobiological processes in different types of decision-making. In the journal Nature Communications, they report that variations in the ratio of two messenger substances affects short-term and long-term strategic decisions in a different manner. As indicated by other studies, different…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Three things to know about the disastrous flood in India

    Three things to know about the disastrous flood in India

    A flash flood surged down a river in India’s Himalayan Uttarakhand state on February 7, killing at least 30 people and washing away two hydroelectric power stations. As rescue workers search for more than 100 people who are still missing, officials and scientists are trying to unravel the causes of the sudden flood. Did a glacier high up in the…

    Read More »
  • Photo of ‘Under a White Sky’ – What can we do with nature to save it.

    ‘Under a White Sky’ – What can we do with nature to save it.

    Under a White Sky Elizabeth Kolbert Crown, $28 In 1900, the city of Chicago completed a 45-kilometer-long canal that altered the hydrology of two-thirds of the United States. That wasn’t the intention, of course. The plan was to reverse the flow of the Chicago River to divert waste away from the city’s source of drinking water: Lake Michigan. The engineering…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Why don’t spiders bleed if their leg breaks?

    Why don’t spiders bleed if their leg breaks?

    Check out ‘Bob the Former Disabled Tarantula’ on Facebook. This pet (now renamed Bobbi after she was discovered to be female) lost seven legs during an escape attempt, only to regrow them at her next moult, a few months later. She didn’t bleed to death because when spiders lose legs, they usually come off at ‘break points’ – joints which…

    Read More »
  • Photo of How a tiny spider uses silk to lift prey 50 times its own weight

    How a tiny spider uses silk to lift prey 50 times its own weight

    A family of spiders can catch prey many times their own weight by hitching silk lines to their quarry and hoisting the meaty prize up into the air. Tangle web spiders, in the Theridiidae family, are masters of using silk to amplify muscle power. Their webs are “a messy tangle,” says Gabriele Greco, who studies biological materials at the University…

    Read More »
  • Photo of Ship exhaust studies overestimate cooling from pollution-altered clouds

    Ship exhaust studies overestimate cooling from pollution-altered clouds

    Among the biggest questions for climate change forecasters is how atmospheric aerosols shape clouds, which can help cool the planet. Now, a new study finds that one promising strategy for understanding how aerosols and clouds interact can overestimate the cooling ability of pollution-generated clouds by up to 200 percent, researchers report in the Jan. 29 Science. “Clouds in general, and…

    Read More »
Back to top button
Close
Close